The World Some of us Live In

The American writer Jacob Weisberg informs us: In one recent survey, female students at Baylor University reported using their cell phones an average of ten hours a day. Three quarters of eighteen-to-twenty-four-year-olds say that they reach for their phones immediately upon waking up in the morning. Once out of bed, we check our phones an average of 221 times a day […]

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Les Murray’s On Bunyah (2015)

When I was at school I loved the poetry of Judith Wright. Later, when I went to live on the Tablelands of New England, I felt that I already knew them: South of my days’ circle, part of my blood’s country, rises that tableland, high delicate outline of bony slopes wincing under the winter. And her evocation of an old […]

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Kathodon

62 Lidras St, Lefcosia, Cyprus How good it is to settle into a restaurant full of happy people enjoying themselves! The Kathodon is just a stone’s throw from the border with the part of Cyprus that has now been under Turkish occupation for over four decades, and the pictures and slogans that decorate its walls, such as the famous Δεν ξεχνω, together with allusions to […]

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Gilles Dorival on continuities and ruptures between Hellenism and Christianity

In his contribution to a volume of studies edited by Arnaud Perrot (Les Chretiens et l’Hellenisme, Editions rue d’Ulm, 2012), Gilles Dorival turns to territory long familiar in academic discourse, the interface between early Christian thought and that of the surrounding Greek Hellenistic world. He is particularly interested in what he calls continuity and persistence, opposed to discontinuity, rupture and  novelty. […]

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George Steiner on Music

All I know is that music is a sine qua non in my existence. It reinsures what I sense to be, or rather search for in the transcendental…Neither psychoanalysis nor deconstruction nor post-modernism  have had anything revelatory to say about music. This is crucial. These language games of subversive decipherment, of suspicion in the wake of Nietzsche and Freud, are virtually impotent before music. […]

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The Raw Kitchen

181A High St, Fremantle WA The brick walls and the lofty pointed ceiling of the old warehouse which it occupies lend this establishment a serious level of urban grunge, and its menu is similarly confronting, for it isn’t only veggie and dairy free but is based on uncooked foods. Typical of its offerings is the raw food pasta in which strands of zucchini, supplemented by radish, avocado, […]

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What’s the Point of History?

Things are changing so quickly in our world. Perhaps the beginning of the tendency should be placed in the scientific revolution, which remains a fertile area for historical research (the recent works of Steven Weinberg and David Wooton suggest the excitement in the field, and its move beyond the mere listing of ‘discoveries’.) Not merely was this the beginning of a […]

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Ahmet’s Turkish Restaurant

10/168 Grey St, South Brisbane Qld Some of the restaurants in this busy tourist strip rely on customers they are never likely to see again, with bad consequences for their quality and pricing. But many of the folk who eat at Ahmet’s are locals who keep coming back. Some excellent dips, the pancar (beetroot) and sharply flavoured hommus, both of the thick kind you need […]

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Stephen Blackwood’s The Consolation of Boethius as Poetic Liturgy (2015)

The following has been accepted for publication and will appear in a revised form in Classical Review, published by Cambridge University Press, © Cambridge University Press. Blackwood (S.) The Consolation of Boethius as Poetic Liturgy. Pp. xxii + 338, figs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Cased, £75, US$125. ISBN: 978-0-19-871831-4. Writing to the learned polymath Boethius on behalf of the […]

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